News & Events


News

Please see events for already planned courses.

The course is offered by NetLab, a national digital research infrastructure, and a community under DIGHUMLAB.

The course can be taken only by appointment. There is no fixed date, since the course will be offered as needed on an ongoing basis. If you are interested, please take a further look in the brochure. 

More than 98% of the world’s data are now digital. A large part of the data are represented on the web, where content is added, deleted and edited constantly and worldwide. Web archiving is the preservation of content, and may be done individually, as well as by large-scale web archiving initiatives. Contemporary studies in the humanities and social sciences need to make use of web archives where earlier documents or versions may be retrieved, and to preserve findings on the live web for future analysis and reference.

The Online Course in Web Archives and Web Archiving will provide an opportunity to build an understanding of how and why archived web content differs from analogous material (such as printed books), and to get significant hands-on experience with web archives and web archiving, based on a focus in your own specific research interests.

The course is offered by NetLab, a national digital research infrastructure, and a community under DIGHUMLAB.

The course is free of charge for researchers and Ph.D. students at Aarhus University, Aalborg University, University of Copenhagen, University of Southern Denmark, or The Royal Danish Library.

The course will be offered as needed on an ongoing basis. A course may be arranged individually or for a group (with a maximum of eight participants). Our capacity is limited to offering the course  2-3 times per semester; applications for the course will be treated on a first-come, first-serve basis.

For researchers, it will be possible to get abbreviated versions of the course according to your specific needs.

For the full course, a course certificate will be issued upon completion.

For Ph.D. students, the course is equivalent to a Ph.D. seminar, counting as 3 ECTS.

The course is also avaliable for graduate students, for more information on this please refer to the course brochure below.

If you are interested, please take a further look in the brochure. You are welcome to download and send it to colleagues if you consider gathering people for a group course (miximum limit of eight participants).

The course can be accessed only upon agreement, after contacting us as specified in the brochure.

Find NetLab Web Archiving Course Brochure here

The course is hosted on DIGHUMLAB’s online courses portal here

Read more about NetLab, a community under DIGHUMLAB, here

Please see events for already planned courses.

Events

Deadline for signing up 12 October 2017.

This workshop will introduce researchers and students at Aalborg University to the the work with digital tools and the digital archives LARM.fm and Mediestream.

LARM.fm is an online platform where university researchers, teachers, and students have access to a huge archive of Danish radio and television programme.

LARM.fm also offers various search tools and is a workspace for cooperation in research and teaching.

Mediestream is a digital archive for large collections of Danish newspapers, radio and TV programs as well as commercials.

Programme

  • 10.00 – 11.00 Introduction to LARM.fm and Mediestream as archives and tools – Janne Nielsen and Mogens Vestergaard Kjeldsen
  • 11.00 – 11.15 Break
  • 11.15 – 12.15 Workshop with exercises and opportunity to try the archives (bring your own computer)
  • 12.15 – 12.30 Closing

Read the full programme here  (in Danish)

Sign up here – deadline 12 October 2017

 In preparation for the datasprint – ‘Archive for Danish Literature in 3D: Danish Literature, Data & Distant Reading’, HUMlab offers the following workshops:

  • Crach Course in NLP using Python and Voyant – 26 October 2017, 12:00 – 15:00, HUMlab. Registration for the workshop here
  • Download and installation of Python, demonstration of the online tool Voyant – 12 October 2017, 12:30 – 15:00, HUMlab. Registration for the workshop here

Archive for Danish Literature in 3D: Danish Literature, Data & Distant Reading:

  • Datasprint I – 28 October 2017, 10:00 – 15:30, The Royal Danish Library, The Black Diamond
  • Datasprint II – 11 November 2017, 10:00 – 17:30, The Royal Danish Library, The Black Diamond

Everyone with interest in Danish Literature, data or distant reading is welcome.

The program consists of presentations, hands-on workshops and software demonstrations.

Text materials and data are provided by the Archive for Danish Literature, technical advice and tools by the Royal Danish Library.

Please register and find the full program (in Danish) for the datasprint here

  • Datasprint I – 28 October 2017, 10:00 – 15:30, The Royal Danish Library, The Black Diamond
  • Datasprint II – 11 November 2017, 10:00 – 17:30, The Royal Danish Library, The Black Diamond

 In preparation for the datasprint HUMlab offers the following workshops:

  • Download and installation of Python, demonstration of the online tool Voyant – 12 October 2017, 12:30 – 15:00, HUMlab. Registration here
  • Crach Course in NLP using Python and Voyant – 26 October 2017, 12:00 – 15:00, HUMlab. Registration here

Everyone with interest in Danish Literature, data or distant reading is welcome.

The program consists of presentations, hands-on workshops and software demonstrations.

Text materials and data are provided by the Archive for Danish Literature, technical advice and tools by the Royal Danish Library.

Please register and find the full program (in Danish) here

Programme
The DARIAH Innovation Forum opens in the evening of Nov 2 with a keynote by Prof. Andrew Perkis on Arts and Technology and a presentation of the new DARIAH Innovation Board. The opening venue is AROS (Aarhus Art Museum, en.aros.dk)

On Nov 3 workshops on innovation in the digital transformation (Art, Humanities, GLAM, Creative Industries, Smart Environments) and presentations of DARIAH services and projects (Annual Themes 2016-2017) will be hosted at the new, beautiful Moesgaard Museum (Museum for Cultural Heritage, Archeology, and Anthropology, http://www.moesgaardmuseum.dk/en/). The DARIAH Innovation Forum also offers a guided tour in Moesgaard’s digitally enhanced exhibition of immersive cultural history narratives.

On Nov 4 the DARIAH Innovation Forum closes with a matchmaking event for public-private partnerships in research and innovation. The matchmaking event will be run in collaboration with Region Greater Denmark’s Brussels Office, and will target a number of upcoming European application calls for research and innovation, education and cultural creative collaboration.

There is no attendance fee, but registration is required.

Find more information here

Registration here

DIGHUMLAB, a national Digital Humanities Research Infrastructure, invites to a one-day conference, where we will put the digital research within the humanities and social sciences into perspective through two keynote talks.

Keynote speakers:

  • ‘Culture Analytics: Challenges for Multi-Scale Study’ by Professor Timothy R. Tangherlini, UCLA, University of California

  •  ‘Storing Stuff, Structuring Stories. The power of digital archives in contemporary historiography’ by Associate Professor Helle Strandgaard Jensen, Department of History and Classical Studies, Aarhus University

Furthermore, we will highlight some of the research activities through a number of shorter talks, posters and demonstrations of the outcome:

  • Highlights from the Special Interst Groups (SIGs)
  • Presentations: Research resulting from the use of DIGHUMLAB
  • Demonstrations and posters – from the DIGHUMLAB communities and the SIGs

DIGHUMLAB is a digital ecosystem supporting research and competence building within the humanities and social sciences in Denmark. It offers access to a range of tools and supporting activities organized in communities.

DIGHUMLAB is the Danish representative in the two European ERICs:

Presently the communities represented in DIGHUMLAB are:

Please sign-up here

Day 1:

Production, content and usage

  • Sean Takats, George Mason University and Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media “From Ephemera to Archive: The New Digital Practices of Historical Research”
  • Julia Noordegraff, University of Amsterdam Title TBA
  • Bob Nicholson, Edge Hill University “In Search of America: Exploring Transatlantic Relations Using Digital Archives”
  • Nanna Bonde Thylstrup, University of Copenhagen Title TBA
  • Ulrich Tiedau, University College London “Text- and Sentiment-Mining for Cultural Historical Inquiry”

Day 2:

Potentials and collaboration

  • Søren Bitsch Christensen, City Archivist, Director of Aarhus City Archives “Constructing a Digital and a Digitized Archive – from the point of view of the Archive”    
  • Katrine Gasser & Ditte Laursen , The Royal Danish Library Title TBA  
  • Niklas Jensen, National Archives, Denmark “Digitizing the Danish West Indies: Goals and challenges of the Danish National Archives’ project to put its West Indian records online”
  • Jane Winters, School of Advanced Study, University of London “Born digital data and approaches for history: bringing together libraries, archives and researchers”

You can register for one day or both.

Poster: Find the poster here

Registration: Please register before October 27 using the link here (first-come, first-serve, max. 50 people).

On November 16 and 17, Centre for Internet Studies and NetLab will host a series of events featuring Richard Rogers, Professor of New Media and Digital Culture at the University of Amsterdam and director of the Digital Methods Initiative.

Richard Rogers is the author of Digital Methods (MIT Press, 2013), which won ICA’s Outstanding Book Award in 2014, The End of the Virtual (Amsterdam University Press, 2009), Information Politics on the Web (MIT Press, 2004/2005) and many other publications.

The Digital Methods Initiative (DMI) is one of the leading research groups within Internet Studies, and they specialise in designing methods and tools for repurposing online devices and platforms (Twitter, Facebook, Google etc.) for research into social and political issues.

 

Pre-sessions:

Friday 10 November:

9.30-11.30:  Pre-session for students with discussion about Rogers’ book Digital Methods.

13-15:  Pre-session for researchers with discussion about Rogers’ book Digital Methods.

The deadline for signing up is Friday 15 September. Please notice that a limited number of seats for the workshops are available. We will send out information about attendance after the deadline.

More information about the events here

Sign up here

 

Programme:

Thursday 16 November:

9-10: Lecture by Richard Rogers with a broad introduction to Digital Methods.

The lecture, hosted by the Centre for Internet Studies, is open for all, so you don’t have to sign up for the lecture in advance. It will take place in Incuba (building 5510), room 104 (the small auditorium).

10-13:  Workshop for researchers about Digital Methods, focus on online web.

14-17:  Workshop for students about Digital Methods, focus on online web.

Friday 17 November:

10-11:  Presentation at NetLab Forum about Digital Methods, focus on archived web (followed by the rest of the NetLab Forum 11-12).

  • Datasprint II – 11 November 2017, 10:00 – 17:30, The Royal Danish Library, The Black Diamond
  • Datasprint I – 28 October 2017, 10:00 – 15:30, The Royal Danish Library, The Black Diamond

 In preparation for the datasprint HUMlab offers the following workshops:

  • Download and installation of Python, demonstration of the online tool Voyant – 12 October 2017, 12:30 – 15:00, HUMlab. Registration here
  • Crach Course in NLP using Python and Voyant – 26 October 2017, 12:00 – 15:00, HUMlab. Registration here

Everyone with interest in Danish Literature, data or distant reading is welcome.

The program consists of presentations, hands-on workshops and software demonstrations.

Text materials and data are provided by the Archive for Danish Literature, technical advice and tools by the Royal Danish Library.

Please register and find the full program (in Danish) here

Introduction

The constitution of language resources represents one of the major productions for researchers and laboratories in social sciences and humanities (SSH) in many years. In the field of language sciences, the exploitation and analysis of linguistic data have made a significant leap forward with the contribution of corpus linguistics and computer processes. Firstly, it proves vital in uniting established and emerging scientific practices, relatively divergent according to different fields (phonetics/phonology, lexicon, morphosyntax, semantics, text linguistics and discourse linguistics) and communities. Secondly, it is a matter of making the benefits and methods of tool-assisted linguistic analysis accessible to all SSH researchers, who base their works on the analysis of linguistic data, whether text, speech or multimodal productions. 

Goal of the workshop

The goal of this symposium is to create a dialogue between these different communities of researchers, whether they be producers or users of resources and/or tools. The methodological approaches that associate different modes of exploitation and analysis of speech and text corpora will be particularly welcomed. 

Invited speakers

– Bente Maegaard (CLARIN ERIC, Centre for Language Technologie at University of Copenhagen)
– Stefan Evert (FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg)
– Damon Mayaffre (BCL UMR 7320, Université Nice Sophia Antipolis),
– Christophe Parisse (Modyco UMR 7114, Université Paris Ouest Nanterre).

Further information here

 

 

Centre for Internet Studies and NetLab will host a series of events featuring Richard Rogers, Professor of New Media and Digital Culture at the University of Amsterdam and director of the Digital Methods Initiative.

Richard Rogers is the author of Digital Methods (MIT Press, 2013), which won ICA’s Outstanding Book Award in 2014, The End of the Virtual (Amsterdam University Press, 2009), Information Politics on the Web (MIT Press, 2004/2005) and many other publications.

The Digital Methods Initiative (DMI) is one of the leading research groups within Internet Studies, and they specialise in designing methods and tools for repurposing online devices and platforms (Twitter, Facebook, Google etc.) for research into social and political issues.

Programme:

Thursday 16 November:

9-10: Lecture by Richard Rogers with a broad introduction to Digital Methods.

The lecture, hosted by the Centre for Internet Studies, is open for all, so you don’t have to sign up for the lecture in advance. It will take place in Incuba (building 5510), room 104 (the small auditorium).

10-13:  Workshop for researchers about Digital Methods, focus on online web.

14-17:  Workshop for students about Digital Methods, focus on online web.

Friday 17 November:

10-11:  Presentation at NetLab Forum about Digital Methods, focus on archived web (followed by the rest of the NetLab Forum 11-12).

Pre-sessions:

Friday 10 November:

9.30-11.30:  Pre-session for students with discussion about Rogers’ book Digital Methods.

13-15:  Pre-session for researchers with discussion about Rogers’ book Digital Methods.

The deadline for signing up is Friday 15 September. Please notice that a limited number of seats for the workshops are available. We will send out information about attendance after the deadline.

More information about the events here

Sign up here

 

Ethical issues and legislation

In collaboration, AU Datalab and DIGETIK invite all researchers – including PhD students working with digital material and facing ethical and legal dilemmas in this regard to participate in a one-day research seminar focusing on the perils and practices of researching our increasingly digitally saturated social lives.

The aim of the seminar is to bring together researchers whose empirical material is partly or entirely digital, in order to discuss the ethical and legal dimensions of their research projects.

Through presentations and discussion of current legal and ethical frameworks and through discussions of how we as researchers do actually go about doing our research in ethically sound ways, we hope to:

1) render visible current “best practices” of digital research

2) inquire the dilemmas of these practices in order to support digital researchers in navigating the murky waters of digital ethics

Not least, the aim of the seminar is to improve, qualify, and empower ethical decision-making in digital research.

PhD students will be awarded 1 ECTS-point for their participation. Suggested readings will be sent out by e-mail in the beginning of November.

Programme, further information and signing up here

This mini-conference on BIG VIDEO will take place at Aalborg University, Denmark.

The keynote speakers are:

  1. Anne Harris, RMIT, Australia
  2. Robert Willim, Lund University, Sweden
  3. Adam Fouse, Aptima, USA
  4. Paul McIlvenny & Jacob Davidsen, Aalborg University

The conference is supported by the national Digital Humanities Lab 1.0 infrastructure programme in Denmark, with assistance from the Department of Communication and Psychology.

Find more details here

The lecturers are Claus Povlsen, CST and Kristoffer L. Nielbo, DIGHUMLAB.

The recent explosion in digitized and digital text-media is thoroughly changing the evidential basis for the humanities.

While the humanities used to be the principal scientific consumers of text-based data, the majority of text analysis is now performed by ‘machines’ outside traditional humanistic domains.

Text-Analytics applies automated and data-intensive techniques in order to extract useful knowledge from large collections of linguistic data.

In this PhD course, the participant will acquire experience with two major machine learning paradigms (supervised and unsupervised learning) in order to answer research questions fundamental to the humanities: can we classify texts by genres, periods and status and how do surface structures reveal latent semantic properties.

The workshop consists of a series of hands-on tutorials with Python combined with useful explanations and illustrations through use-cases. Programming experience is not a requirement, but participants are expected to prepare by installing Python and completing three introductory tutorials available on-line. Information about this will be distributed by the lecturers after the registration deadline.

Find more information here

Europe’s leading e-infrastructures, EGI, EUDAT, GÉANT, OpenAIRE, PRACE and RDA Europe, invite all researchers, developers and service providers for two days of brainstorming and discussions at the Digital Infrastructures for Research 2017 event.

Under the theme “Connecting the building blocks for Open Science”, the 2017 edition of the DI4R conference will showcase the policies, processes, best practices, data and services that, leveraging today’s initiatives – national, regional, European and international – are the building blocks of the European Open Science Cloud and European Data Infrastructure.

The overarching goal is to demonstrate how open science, higher education and innovators can benefit from these building blocks, and ultimately to advance integration and cooperation between initiatives.

The event is collocated with the EOSCpilot 1st Stakeholder Engagement Event taking place on the 28 & 29 November 2017.

Find more information here

 

The 4th Digital Humanities Austria Conference in cooperation with DARIAH, CLARIN and Digital Humanities Austria will take place at the University of Innsbruck.
 

The conference this year is according to the motto “Data First!?”. The (half)-automatized data production and its quality, analysis, interpretation and visualization is gaining importance throughout the humanities.

The purpose of this conference is to develop an exchange of experiences between humanities scholars, employees of libraries, archives, as well as computer sciences and technologies.

Successful research activities in the field of digital humanities are (almost) always determined by interdisciplinarity, skills of different research fields will be required. Due to that, the involvement of new developments in related research areas is important to us.

Young scientists are particularly encouraged to present their research results in front of a broad audience – for example in the form of a poster or a demonstration.

Further information here

The 3rd conference of the association of Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries (DHN) will be held at the University of Helsinki March 7–9, 2018. The conference is organised by the Faculty of Arts at the University of Helsinki.

In 2018, the conference seeks to extend the scope of digital humanities research covered, both into new areas, as well as beyond the Nordic and Baltic countries. This year, the conference welcomes in particular work related to the following themes: History, Cultural Heritage, Games, and Future.

The overarching theme this year is Open Science. This pragmatic concept emphasises the role of transparent and reproducible research practices, open dissemination of results, and new forms of collaboration, all greatly facilitated by digitalisation. All proposals are invited to reflect on the benefits, challenges, and prospects of open science for their own research. 

Information will be provided on the conference website here

In April 2018, the Faculty of Arts of KU Leuven and the KU Leuven Libraries are hosting a European Conference for the Humanities on behalf of the European Consortium of Humanities Institutes and Centres (ECHIC).

Like the preceding ECHIC conferences in Dublin, Utrecht, Nottingham, Oporto, Pamplona, Macerata and Edinburgh, the conference aims to probe some of the most pressing issues facing the humanities as academic disciplines and interdisciplinary fields.

In 2018, the theme is “Equip & Engage: Research and Dissemination Infrastructures for the Humanities”. Papers and discussions will be focused around (challenges connected to) digital scholarship in the humanities and the dissemination and impact of the results of this research.

The conference programme will feature keynote lectures, conference papers, project presentations/demos, lightning talks and panel discussions, as well as the annual meeting of ECHIC and diverse networking opportunities.

Confirmed keynote speakers are Jane Ohlmeyer, who is Erasmus Smith’s Professor of Modern History and Director of Trinity Long Room Hub at Trinity College Dublin, and Martin Paul Eve, who is Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing at Birkbeck, University of London, and well-known for his work on open access and HE policy.

Further information here

11th conference on Language Resources and Evaluation, main conference: 9-10-11 May 2018, workshops and tutorials: 7-8 & 12 May 2018

Conference Aims:

LREC is the major event on Language Resources (LRs) and Evaluation for Human Language Technologies (HLT). LREC aims to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art, explore new R&D directions and emerging trends, exchange information regarding LRs and their applications, evaluation methodologies and tools, communicate on-going and planned activities, identify industrial uses and needs, and address requirements from e-science and e-society, with respect to scientific, technology, policy and organisational issues.

For this edition, LREC goes East in order to support a stronger interaction and synergy with the Asian NLP community and to help promoting Asian Language Resources and Language Technologies.

LREC provides a unique forum for researchers, industrials and funding agencies from a wide spectrum of related disciplines to discuss issues and opportunities, find new synergies and promote initiatives for international cooperation, in support of investigations in language sciences, progress in language technologies (LT) and development of corresponding products, services and applications, and standards.

Conference Topics:

  • Issues in the design, construction and use of LRs: text, speech, sign, gesture, image, in single or multimodal/multimedia data
  • Exploitation of LRs in systems and applications
  • Issues in LT evaluation
  • General issues regarding LRs & Evaluation

LREC 2018 hot Topics:

  • Asian Language Resources

Special attention will be devoted to highlight the wide variety of initiatives for the creation, use and evaluation of Asian Language Resources and Technologies. Special attention will be paid to Less-Resourced Languages in the Asian area, including (local) Sign Languages.

  • International Contribution to Olympics 2020

LREC 2018 would like to promote all LTs that would support better interactions and communications between the Olympic 2020 visitors and the local hosts. This involves all speech- and text-based computer interactions, speech/sign to speech/sign translations, human-human communications mediated by computers, etc. Assessment of the above mentioned technologies is also an important area within LREC 2018.

  • Language Resources in the online World

In a time in which more and more (language) data are generated, either by human beings or by machines, and directly streamed, the question arises how LRs and LTs can cope with this development. A first challenge is to address and to provide for correctives to hate speeches, cyberbullying, fake news, etc. Can LT provide means to process and respond in a timely manner to such language data streamed in a huge amount at high speed? In this context, language technologists have to intensify cooperation with humanities, especially social and political sciences, psychology but also economics, and more.

Further information here