News & Events


News

11th Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation, main conference: 9 – 11 May 2018, workshops and tutorials: 7-8 & 12 May 2018 

LREC is the major event on Language Resources (LRs) and Evaluation for Human Language Technologies (HLT). LREC aims to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art, explore new R&D directions and emerging trends, exchange information regarding LRs and their applications, evaluation methodologies and tools, communicate on-going and planned activities, identify industrial uses and needs, and address requirements from e-science and e-society, with respect to scientific, technology, policy and organisational issues.

For this edition, LREC goes East in order to support a stronger interaction and synergy with the Asian NLP community and to help promoting Asian Language Resources and Language Technologies.

CONFERENCE TOPICS:

  • Issues in the design, construction and use of LRs: text, speech, sign, gesture, image, in single or multimodal/multimedia data
  • Exploitation of LRs in systems and applications
  • Issues in LT evaluation
  • General issues regarding LRs & Evaluation

LREC 2018 HOT TOPICS

  • Asian Language Resources

Special attention will be devoted to highlight the wide variety of initiatives for the creation, use and evaluation of Asian Language Resources and Technologies. Special attention will be paid to Less-Resourced Languages in the Asian area, including (local) Sign Languages.

  • International Contribution to Olympics 2020

LREC 2018 would like to promote all LTs that would support better interactions and communications between the Olympic 2020 visitors and the local hosts. This involves all speech- and text-based computer interactions, speech/sign to speech/sign translations, human-human communications mediated by computers, etc. Assessment of the above mentioned technologies is also an important area within LREC 2018.

  • Language Resources in the online World

In a time in which more and more (language) data are generated, either by human beings or by machines, and directly streamed, the question arises how LRs and LTs can cope with this development. A first challenge is to address and to provide for correctives to hate speeches, cyberbullying, fake news, etc. Can LT provide means to process and respond in a timely manner to such language data streamed in a huge amount at high speed? In this context, language technologists have to intensify cooperation with humanities, especially social and political sciences, psychology but also economics, and more.

PROGRAMME

The Scientific Programme will include invited talks, oral presentations, poster and demo presentations, and panels, in addition to a keynote address by the winner of the Antonio Zampolli Prize. A
n Industrial Track will also be arranged.

SUBMISSIONS AND DATES

Submission of proposals for oral and poster (or poster+demo) papers: 25 September 2017

  • LREC2018 asks for extended abstracts of no less than 3000 words (references excluded), which must strictly follow the LREC stylesheet which will be available on the conference website. Extended abstracts should be submitted through START and will be peer-reviewed..

Submission of proposals for panels, workshops and tutorials: 25 September 2017

  • Proposals should be submitted via an online form on the LREC website and will be reviewed by the Programme Committee.

Further information here

New book, The Web as History, edited by professor Niels Brügger and Professor Ralph Schroeder, free PDF download

The web has been with us for more than a quarter of a century. It has become a daily and ubiquitous source of information in many peoples’ lives around the globe. But what does it tell us about historical and social change? For a researcher in the twenty-second century, it will seem unimaginable that someone studying the twenty-first century would do anything but draw heavily on the online world to tell them about peoples’ changing lives. Currently, however, the web remains an almost untapped source for research. This book aims to make a start in this direction.

The 12 chapters explore this topic from a number of interdisciplinary angles – through histories of national web spaces and case studies of different government and media domains – as well as an introduction that provides an overview of this exciting new area of research.

Chapter 3 ‘Exploring the domain names of the Danish web’ is written by Niels Brügger, Ditte Laursen and Janne Nielsen. What does an entire national web domain look like? And how can its development over time be understood? Using the Danish web as a case study, this chapter explores these questions by studying the historical development of the .dk domain names and the .dk domains archived in the Danish national web archive, Netarkivet, as well as in the international US-based web archive Internet Archive.

Editors

Niels Brügger is Professor and Head of the Centre for Internet Studies and of the internet research infrastructure NetLab, Aarhus University. He is co-founder and Managing Editor of the international journal, Internet Histories: Digital Technology, Culture and Society. Recent publications include Histories of Public Service Broadcasters on the Web (edited with Burns, 2012), and Web25, a themed issue of New Media & Society.

Ralph Schroeder is Professor and Director of the Master’s course in Social Science of the Internet at the Oxford Internet Institute. Before coming to Oxford University, he was Professor at Chalmers University in Gothenburg. His recent books include Rethinking Science, Technology and Social Change (2007) and, co-authored with Eric T. Meyer, Knowledge Machines: Digital Transformations of the Sciences and Humanities (2015).

Publication and License

The book is published by UCL Press with support from the School of Advanced Study, University of London, Aarhus University Research Foundation, and Webster Research and Consulting.

It is published under a Creative Common 4.0 International license (CC BY4.0). This license allows you to share, copy, distribute and transmit the work; to adapt the work and to make commercial use of the work providing attribution is made to the authors (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work).

Attribution should include the following information: Niels Brügger and Ralph Schroeder (eds.), The Web as History. London, UCL Press, 2017.  https://doi.org/10.14324/111.9781911307563

Download or buy the book as hardback, paperback or epub here

Please see events for already planned courses.

The course is offered by NetLab, a national digital research infrastructure, and a community under DIGHUMLAB.

The course can be taken only by appointment. There is no fixed date, since the course will be offered as needed on an ongoing basis. If you are interested, please take a further look in the brochure. 

More than 98% of the world’s data are now digital. A large part of the data are represented on the web, where content is added, deleted and edited constantly and worldwide. Web archiving is the preservation of content, and may be done individually, as well as by large-scale web archiving initiatives. Contemporary studies in the humanities and social sciences need to make use of web archives where earlier documents or versions may be retrieved, and to preserve findings on the live web for future analysis and reference.

The Online Course in Web Archives and Web Archiving will provide an opportunity to build an understanding of how and why archived web content differs from analogous material (such as printed books), and to get significant hands-on experience with web archives and web archiving, based on a focus in your own specific research interests.

The course is offered by NetLab, a national digital research infrastructure, and a community under DIGHUMLAB.

The course is free of charge for researchers and Ph.D. students at Aarhus University, Aalborg University, University of Copenhagen, University of Southern Denmark, or The Royal Danish Library.

The course will be offered as needed on an ongoing basis. A course may be arranged individually or for a group (with a maximum of eight participants). Our capacity is limited to offering the course  2-3 times per semester; applications for the course will be treated on a first-come, first-serve basis.

For researchers, it will be possible to get abbreviated versions of the course according to your specific needs.

For the full course, a course certificate will be issued upon completion.

For Ph.D. students, the course is equivalent to a Ph.D. seminar, counting as 3 ECTS.

The course is also avaliable for graduate students, for more information on this please refer to the course brochure below.

If you are interested, please take a further look in the brochure. You are welcome to download and send it to colleagues if you consider gathering people for a group course (miximum limit of eight participants).

The course can be accessed only upon agreement, after contacting us as specified in the brochure.

Find NetLab Web Archiving Course Brochure here

The course is hosted on DIGHUMLAB’s online courses portal here

Read more about NetLab, a community under DIGHUMLAB, here

Please see events for already planned courses.

University of Helsinki Faculty of Arts invites applications for 3 POSTDOC researchers within Digital Humanities for a fixed term period from 1 September 2017 onwards (or as agreed) for a maximum of three years. The period (1-3 years) depends of the candidate’s research plan.

The university is looking for candidates with expertise on computational science, linguistics and history/cultural heritage.

The three successful candidates will be members of a research community that already includes, for example, Academy of Finland’s project on “Computational History and the Transformation of Public Discourse”, 2015-2019.

The data that the research community is using includes various historical full-text collections and large metadata collections, mainly in English, Finnish and Swedish.

The group is particularly interested in studying conceptual change, intertextuality based on text-reuse and statistical analysis of knowledge production.

The deadline for the application is July 9, 2017.

Further information of the positions can be obtained from Professor Mikko Tolonen, mikko.tolonen at helsinki.fi

More information here

Summer School in advanced tools for digital humanities and it, Bulgaria, 7 – 11 September 2017

The Centre for Excellence in the Humanities to the University of Sofia, Bulgaria, has the pleasure to invite, for a fourth time, experts in the fields of Digital Humanities and Information Technologies to an Advanced Summer School in Digital Humanities.

The summer school relies on the cooperation of world-leading instructors from academic institutions in the UK and USA and will include the following modules:

  • Training in Linked Spatial Data, Geo-annotation, Visualisation and Information system (Geography and Topography) – with Valeria Vitale (School of Advanced Studies, University of London), Gabriel Bodard (School of Advanced Studies, University of London);
  • Training in Python for data extraction, enriching and cataloguing – with Simona Stoyanova (School of Advanced Studies, University of London) and Gabriel Bodard (School of Advanced Studies, University of London);
  • Training in EpiDoc and TEI markup, use of vocabularies, and web delivery (including external URI use, XSLT customization, and entity normalization) – with Simona Stoyanova (School of Advanced Studies, University of London) and Gabriel Bodard (School of Advanced Studies, University of London);
  • Presentations in Big Data and Information Extraction – Dimitar Birov (University of Sofia) and Eduardo Miranda (Carnegie Mellon University of Pittsburgh).

A round table on the current trends and the future developments of Digital Humanities in South-East Europe.

The participation fee is 50 euros. The transport to and from the mountain resort and the accommodation and meals there will be covered by the organizers.

If you are interested in the Summer School, please send a Curriculum Vitae and a Motivation Letter stating your main areas of interest and expertise, the projects on which you are currently working, as well as which module(s) are relevant for your work and why you would like to attend them.

The applications should be sent to dhsummerschool@uni-sofia.bg no later than 15 June 2017.

More details about the event can be found here

Events

Masterclass, 29 – 30 June 2017

An Foras Feasa, The Research Institute in the Humanities at Maynooth University is delighted to announce a Masterclass on “Participatory Engagement in Digital Humanities Projects”, funded by DARIAH and Humanities at Scale.

This Masterclass, supported by DARIAH and Humanities at Scale, will explore how participatory engagement is increasingly being considered a key component in the design of digital humanities projects. The goal of this Masterclass will be to arrive at a classification of various forms of participation and knowledge production, providing a window onto the issues of creating and managing a participatory engagement digital humanities projects.

PARTICIPATION

This Masterclass is aimed individuals who have an active and/or demonstrable interest in public engagement projects and/or citizen science initiatives. Submissions are especially encouraged from early career researchers and from those from European countries the Humanities at Scale project serves. i.e., countries who do not have a strong tradition of digital humanities research.

It will be limited to 12 participants. Preference will be given to applicants whose area of expertise falls under one or more of the topics covered during the Masterclass and who are currently working or who have worked in the past on participatory engagement projects. The event is open to Irish, European, and international applicants. Accommodation and transportation will be covered for all selected participants up to a maximum of €250 for participants based in the Republic of Ireland and up to €500 for participants outside Ireland. Meals for all days of the event will also be covered.

APPLICATION

Deadline for applications is April 30 2017

Apllication and further information here

3 – 5 July 2017, Madrid

LINHD is pleased to inform that from July 3rd to 5th, 2017, the 4th “DH@Madrid Summer School: Semantic Technologies and Linguistic Tools for Digital Humanities” will take place in Madrid, Spain.

The DH Summer School is part of a number of activities organized by ERC POSTDATA team. The course is sponsored by the CLARIN-ERIC European infrastructure and it brings together a group of leading international experts in Digital Humanities and Natural Language Processing.

This Summer School will be of special interest for humanists working with digital research methods applied to the humanities.

More information and registration here

3 – 5 July 2017, Utrecht, The Netherlands

The DHBenelux conference is an initiative that aims to disseminate digital humanities projects in Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxemburg, and foster collaboration between them.

The conference serves as a platform for DH researchers and offers an opportunity for members of the DH community to meet, present research, demonstrate tools, and discuss projects.

The fourth DHBenelux conference will be hosted by Utrecht University and is open to everyone, including researchers from outside the Benelux.

Further information here

4 – 21 July 2017, Aarhus

In this course, participants will explore Aarhus 2017 related events to learn about how cultural analysis might be enacted in 21st century settings where digital and analog forms blur, where local and global networks collide, and because of this, studying any phenomenon is therefore a complex challenge.

Through a combination of field observations, data gathering, modelling, analysis, and prototyping the aim is to introduce and develop new tools and methods for understanding and communicating about cultural experiences in the age of Big Data.

Particularly, we are interested in how the production and collection of data has become an inevitable part of any cultural institution, yet it is unclear what counts as data, what the data is (or can be) actually used for, and how various stakeholders deal with broken data, missing data, surplus data, etc. Cities and regions, cultural institutions and organisations, as well as specific industries and economies have a strong interest in developing new models for organising and making sense of such data.

Further information here

Implicit in the concept of access to knowledge is the idea of sustainability. As the idea that we should move towards a more open approach to conducting and disseminating research takes hold it is incumbent on libraries to ensure that in this shifting environment that the accessibility, usability, and long term availability of research outcomes are taken care of. This is a proactive role requiring leadership, vision, innovation and a flexible approach to partnering with researchers and infrastructure.

In the vision for the research landscape 2022 LIBER has identified 5 goals to work towards:

  1. Open access is the predominant form of publishing
  2. Research data is FAIR
  3. Digital skills underpin a more open and transparent research lifecycle
  4. Research infrastructure is open, participatory and scaled to the needs of diverse disciplines
  5. Cultural heritage of tomorrow is built on today’s digital information

Find programme and further information here

24 July – 4 August 2017, Aarhus

Books, documents, and newspapers have always been essential information resources in the humanities and social sciences. With the arrival of digital media the amount of texts available is increasing at an extremely high velocity. Classical methods for text analysis are defeated by the sheer volume leading to a massive amount of unread documents. To handle this ‘great unread’ we have to invent new computer-assisted ways of discovering meaningful patterns in texts. Such digital tools and data-intensive methods for handling big text-heavy data are currently transforming our research disciplines as well as the society around us.

In Text Mining the Great Unread you will learn how to develop and apply tools and methods for mining high quality information in texts. This will enable you to answer text-related research questions from the humanities and social sciences in a highly innovative and efficient manner. You will learn how to access digital databases, analyze thousands of documents and communicate your results to academia and industry alike.

The aim of the course is to provide theoretical, methodological and practical competences in text mining for humanities and social science students. The course will cover 1: how to delineate and evaluate research problems in terms of text mining solutions; 2: how to design and implement knowledge discovery pipelines; and 3: how to communicate through presentation, visualization and reports.

The core of the course is a series of hands-on workshops that cover concrete text-related problems and solutions. Workshops are supplemented by lectures and tutorials given by international researchers and industry experts. Participants will have the option of working with their own data sets and corpora. Importantly, participants are not expected to have prior experience with text mining (i.e., programming, statistics, or visualization). The only prerequisite is a positive interest in discovering new knowledge in texts.

Further information here

 

 

24 July – 18 August 2017, Aarhus

Are you interested in digital games and want to know what potentials virtual reality (VR) technologies have to offer in this regard? Today consumer VR technologies, from cardboard boxes containing lenses and smartphones to elaborate PC-driven systems, are set to become a part of everyday media use. Technology giants such as Facebook, Google and Valve are prioritizing VR and content providers of all stripes are eager to join in.

GAME.PLAY.THEORY is an interdisciplinary and project-oriented Summer School that revolves around digital games as research, media, design, culture and practice, this time with a specific focus on working with and rethinking VR.

The lecturers are themselves interdisciplinary in their approach having professional basis in media studies, information studies, digital design, educational design and technoogy, experience design and aesthetics.

The aim of the course is to gain insight into, discuss, critically reflect on and productively put to use different perspectives in a generative way in order to strengthen, sharpen and nuance one’s own profession in relation to digital games as phenomenon, practice and research domain. In this way, the distinctive humanistic theoretical, analytical, methodological and project-oriented skills and competencies of the individual student is put into play and put to use in the midterm and final exam where students and lectures meet to present, discuss and critically reflect on each others projects (perhaps even outside the university walls).

In 2017 the course has a special focus on ‘ReThink(ing) VR’ in tribute to Aarhus being the European Capital of Culture and will take the form as a mini-conference celebrating critical and creative re-thinking around the potentials, pitfalls and possibilities of VR in relation to digital games.

“RETHINK means that we build on what currently exists, while also exploring whether things can be done differently. The theme RETHINK provides Aarhus2017 with the opportunity to create a “cultural laboratory” in the whole region where innovation and alternative solutions can develop and take root.”

We will through ‘Game.Play.Theory’ work proactively with this, rethinking the meaning, design, interactions and experience that gameplay can hold.

Further information here

31 July – 11 August 2017, Aarhus

In this course, participants will explore the topic of digital living by reading and discussing key issues, concepts, and theories of identity in digital contexts. Attitudes about social media and the forms of social life that emerge with them range from enthusiastic to suspicious. Scholars discuss the issues in different ways.

On the one hand, we benefit greatly from our connection to technologies. People can experiment with new personae, new social communities. We have access to more information than ever before, which allows us to acquire more in-depth knowledge, if we seek it out.

On the other hand, the “always on” state of the mobile internet (smart phones, e.g.) plus the rise of social networking sites (Facebook and Twitter, e.g.) prompts many critiques. Are we better off? What happens when our everyday activities via the internet are under surveillance? How do the algorithms of Google influence what we are exposed to? The course will take up these questions and issues.

Students will read contributions from internationally leading scholars in order to investigate ‘digital living’ and the opportunities and challenges that come with social media and the internet.

Further information here

3 – 4 August 2017, Vancouver

Joint SIGHUM Workshop on Computational Linguistics for Cultural Heritage, Social Sciences, Humanities and Literature.

LaTeCH-CLfL 2017 will put in the same room two events with a similar research focus and with some tradition: the SIGHUM Workshops on Language Technology for Cultural Heritage, Social Sciences, and Humanities (LaTeCH) and the ACL Workshops on Computational Linguistics for Literature (CLfL).

The LaTeCH workshop series has become a forum for researchers who develop new technologies for improved information access to data from the broadly understood humanities and social sciences. Since the formation of SIGHUM (ACL Special Interest Group on Language Technologies for the Socio-Economic Sciences and Humanities), the LaTeCH workshop has also been the venue for the SIGHUM annual research and business meeting.

The CLfL workshops have focussed on applications of NLP to a wide variety of literary data. This joint event will bring together researchers from both research communities. We hope to broaden the scope, stimulate more collaboration and open new research perspectives.

Further information here

7 August – 22 September 2017, online

More than 98% of the world’s data are now digital. A large part of the data are represented on the web, where content is added, deleted and edited constantly and worldwide. Web archiving is the preservation of content, and may be done individually, as well as by large-scale web archiving initiatives. Contemporary studies in the humanities and social sciences need to make use of web archives where earlier documents or versions may be retrieved, and to preserve findings on the live web for future analysis and reference.

The Online Course in Web Archives and Web Archiving will provide an opportunity to build an understanding of how and why archived web content differs from analogous material (such as printed books), and to get significant hands-on experience with web archives and web archiving, based on a focus in your own specific research interests.

The course is offered by NetLab, a national digital research infrastructure, and a community under DIGHUMLAB.

The course is free of charge for researchers and Ph.D. students at Aarhus University, Aalborg University, University of Copenhagen, University of Southern Denmark, or The Royal Danish Library.

For Ph.D. students, the course is equivalent to a Ph.D. seminar, counting as 3 ECTS.

Further information and registration here

14 – 18 August 2017, Copenhagen

Big Data is omnipresent from industries to government and is frequently considered a completely new approach to problem solving. While the possibilities are often exaggerated, Big Data does indeed introduce new opportunities and challenges. The ability to analyse and combine large data from different sources has obvious applications, nonetheless, the lack of quality in the data combined with a high variance means that conventional analysis often fails.

This course will bring you to the forefront of the newest tools and methods based on cutting edge research and experience.

What you will learn
By completing the course you will be able to set up basic Big Data Analysis end-to-end; from retrieving and cleaning the data, to establishing the information level and extracting patterns and finding outliers and to curate the necessary data.

You will get acquainted with a number of advanced tools like: Data cleaning, statistical methods for very large datasets, data stream analysis and finding patterns and outliers in Big Data, collecting data from instruments and devices (i.e. internet of things) and hardware systems design for efficient BDA.

Course Content
We will use a few structured datasets consistently throughout the course, which illustrate the commerce and will be used to demonstrate the different steps in Big Data Analysis.

Core elements:

  • Data cleaning: Detecting and correcting (or removing) corrupt or inaccurate records
  • Statistical methods: Robust methods for very large datasets and data with very large variance and outliers
  • Finding patterns and outliers in Big Data: Which methods can be used to identify sparse patterns in very large datasets, and how to identify data that does not follow the overall pattern for a dataset?
  • Collecting data from instruments and devices: How to collect, store, and analyse data from a multitude of sources that produce data (i.e. Internet-of-Things)
  • Systems for Big Data Analysis: Common systems for BDA; Hadoop, PyDisco, etc., and hardware systems design for efficient BDA.

Tools/methods introduced:

  • Selected machine learning algorithms for large-scale data
  • Random forests and large-scale exact nearest neighbour search
  • Data curation: How to select data for long time curation, systems, techniques and standards for data curation
  • We will be working with several programming tools, however all techniques that are covered are easily implemented with all standard data-analysis languages; Python, R, etc.

Participants
The course is strictly focused on Big Data Analysis, thus a background in statistics and/or conventional data analysis is assumed. This course assumes an education at least at a Bachelor level and/or several years of data analysis experience.

Further information and registration here

New Nordic Initiative with focus on basic digital competences invites anyone interesed to join the one-day kick-off workshop.

The objective of the workshop is to obtain a common base for the work.  The following questions will be adressed:

  • Common agreement on the definitions
  • Development of a questionnaire for collecting information on existing activities and perceived competence requirements

If you are interested in participating or being kept informed, please send an email to project coordinator Anne-Marie Bach or project manager Birte Christensen-Dalsgaard

Kindly tell us if you:

  • want to be active and can participate in the workshop,
  • want to be active and want to participate in the workshop via video,
  • want to be active, but can’t participate in the workshop
  • are interested in being kept informed
  • want more information

The event will be conducted over video, in case it is impossible to attend in person.

5 – 9  September 2017, Lisbon
 
The ”FCSH Digital Humanities Summer School: Research methods & Problem-solving” aims at providing concrete answers to specific needs and challenges emerging from projects carried out by master and PhD students, and post-doctoral researchers in the arts, humanities and social sciences. The workshops planned will be delivered by qualified international scholars and professionals aiming to improve, trough theoretical analysis and technological resources, the specific research challenges of the attendees.

Workshops will be organized in a collaborative and interdisciplinary environment to:

  • Focus the Digital Humanities approach on questions raised by students, scholars and professionals;
  • Facilitate the choice of methods, tools and techniques;
  • Shape the research outcomes trough a digital environment;
  • Improve collaborative research and information sharing.

“Tailored to what you need” is the principle that guides and inspires this summer school structured in the following interconnected workshops:

  1. Network analysis for historical and archaeological data
  2. Spatial visualisation of historical and archaeological data

More information and details about registration here

7 – 9 September 2017, Sofia

The Centre for Excellence in the Humanities to the University of Sofia, Bulgaria, has the pleasure to invite, for a fourth time, experts in the fields of Digital Humanities and Information Technologies to an Advanced Summer School in Digital Humanities.

The summer school relies on the cooperation of world-leading instructors from academic institutions in the UK and USA and will include the following modules:

  • Training in Linked Spatial Data, Geo-annotation, Visualisation and Information system (Geography and Topography) – with Valeria Vitale (School of Advanced Studies, University of London), Gabriel Bodard (School of Advanced Studies, University of London);
  • Training in Python for data extraction, enriching and cataloguing – with Simona Stoyanova (School of Advanced Studies, University of London) and Gabriel Bodard (School of Advanced Studies, University of London);
  • Training in EpiDoc and TEI markup, use of vocabularies, and web delivery (including external URI use, XSLT customization, and entity normalization) – with Simona Stoyanova (School of Advanced Studies, University of London) and Gabriel Bodard (School of Advanced Studies, University of London);
  • Presentations in Big Data and Information Extraction – Dimitar Birov (University of Sofia) and Eduardo Miranda (Carnegie Mellon University of Pittsburgh).

A round table on the current trends and the future developments of Digital Humanities in South-East Europe.

The participation fee is 50 euros. The transport to and from the mountain resort and the accommodation and meals there will be covered by the organizers.

If you are interested in the Summer School, please send a Curriculum Vitae and a Motivation Letter stating your main areas of interest and expertise, the projects on which you are currently working, as well as which module(s) are relevant for your work and why you would like to attend them.

The applications should be sent to dhsummerschool@uni-sofia.bg no later than 15 June 2017.

Further information here

Conference, Budapest, 18 – 20 September 2017

The CLARIN Annual Conference is the main annual event for those working on the construction and operation of CLARIN across Europe.

The  Conference is organised for the Humanities and Social Sciences community in order to exchange ideas and experiences on the CLARIN infrastructure. This includes its design, construction and operation, the data and services that it contains or should contain, its actual use by researchers, its relation to other infrastructures and projects, and the CLARIN Knowledge Sharing Infrastructure.

This event is organized by CLARIN ERIC in collaboration with the Research Institute for Linguistics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

Participation in this event is by invitation only. The categories of people to be invited will include authors of accepted papers, members of national consortia and representatives of CLARIN centres as well as representatives from partner organizations.  Once you have been invited to attend the conference, you will receive registration information from your national coordinator or the CLARIN ERIC Office.

Further information will be announced soon – here.

 26 – 27 september 2017, Comwell Kolding

The program commitee for 2017 is :

  • Birte Christensen-Dalsgaard, projektleder, DigHumLab, Aarhus Universitet
  • Carsten Andersen, teamleder, Aarhus Universitet
  • Tangui Coulouarn, projektleder, DeIC
  • Gunnar Bøe, managing director, Sigma2/ UNINETT
  • Klaus Kvorning Hansen, vicedirektør, Københavns Universitet
  • Martin Bech, CTO, DeIC
  • Jens Svalgaard Kohrt, akademisk medarbejder, Syddansk Universitet
  • Kurt Gammelgaard Nielsen, CIO, Syddansk Universitet
  • Morten Als, IT-sikkerhedskoordinator, Danmarks Tekniske Universitet
  • Henriette Monrad, projektleder for DeIC konference, DeIC

More information will be available soon on the conference website here 

This mini-conference on BIG VIDEO will take place at Aalborg University, Denmark.

The keynote speakers are:

  1. Anne Harris, RMIT, Australia
  2. Robert Willim, Lund University, Sweden
  3. Adam Fouse, Aptima, USA
  4. Paul McIlvenny & Jacob Davidsen, Aalborg University

The conference is supported by the national Digital Humanities Lab 1.0 infrastructure programme in Denmark, with assistance from the Department of Communication and Psychology.

Find more details here

The next conference will be held in Helsinki 7-9 March 2018.

Information will be provided on the conference website here

In April 2018, the Faculty of Arts of KU Leuven and the KU Leuven Libraries are hosting a European Conference for the Humanities on behalf of the European Consortium of Humanities Institutes and Centres (ECHIC).

Like the preceding ECHIC conferences in Dublin, Utrecht, Nottingham, Oporto, Pamplona, Macerata and Edinburgh, the conference aims to probe some of the most pressing issues facing the humanities as academic disciplines and interdisciplinary fields.

In 2018, the theme is “Equip & Engage: Research and Dissemination Infrastructures for the Humanities”. Papers and discussions will be focused around (challenges connected to) digital scholarship in the humanities and the dissemination and impact of the results of this research.

The conference programme will feature keynote lectures, conference papers, project presentations/demos, lightning talks and panel discussions, as well as the annual meeting of ECHIC and diverse networking opportunities.

Confirmed keynote speakers are Jane Ohlmeyer, who is Erasmus Smith’s Professor of Modern History and Director of Trinity Long Room Hub at Trinity College Dublin, and Martin Paul Eve, who is Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing at Birkbeck, University of London, and well-known for his work on open access and HE policy.

Further information here

11th conference on Language Resources and Evaluation, main conference: 9-10-11 May 2018, workshops and tutorials: 7-8 & 12 May 2018

Conference Aims:

LREC is the major event on Language Resources (LRs) and Evaluation for Human Language Technologies (HLT). LREC aims to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art, explore new R&D directions and emerging trends, exchange information regarding LRs and their applications, evaluation methodologies and tools, communicate on-going and planned activities, identify industrial uses and needs, and address requirements from e-science and e-society, with respect to scientific, technology, policy and organisational issues.

For this edition, LREC goes East in order to support a stronger interaction and synergy with the Asian NLP community and to help promoting Asian Language Resources and Language Technologies.

LREC provides a unique forum for researchers, industrials and funding agencies from a wide spectrum of related disciplines to discuss issues and opportunities, find new synergies and promote initiatives for international cooperation, in support of investigations in language sciences, progress in language technologies (LT) and development of corresponding products, services and applications, and standards.

Conference Topics:

  • Issues in the design, construction and use of LRs: text, speech, sign, gesture, image, in single or multimodal/multimedia data
  • Exploitation of LRs in systems and applications
  • Issues in LT evaluation
  • General issues regarding LRs & Evaluation

LREC 2018 hot Topics:

  • Asian Language Resources

Special attention will be devoted to highlight the wide variety of initiatives for the creation, use and evaluation of Asian Language Resources and Technologies. Special attention will be paid to Less-Resourced Languages in the Asian area, including (local) Sign Languages.

  • International Contribution to Olympics 2020

LREC 2018 would like to promote all LTs that would support better interactions and communications between the Olympic 2020 visitors and the local hosts. This involves all speech- and text-based computer interactions, speech/sign to speech/sign translations, human-human communications mediated by computers, etc. Assessment of the above mentioned technologies is also an important area within LREC 2018.

  • Language Resources in the online World

In a time in which more and more (language) data are generated, either by human beings or by machines, and directly streamed, the question arises how LRs and LTs can cope with this development. A first challenge is to address and to provide for correctives to hate speeches, cyberbullying, fake news, etc. Can LT provide means to process and respond in a timely manner to such language data streamed in a huge amount at high speed? In this context, language technologists have to intensify cooperation with humanities, especially social and political sciences, psychology but also economics, and more.

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