News & Events


News

11th Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation, main conference: 9 – 11 May 2018, workshops and tutorials: 7-8 & 12 May 2018 

LREC is the major event on Language Resources (LRs) and Evaluation for Human Language Technologies (HLT). LREC aims to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art, explore new R&D directions and emerging trends, exchange information regarding LRs and their applications, evaluation methodologies and tools, communicate on-going and planned activities, identify industrial uses and needs, and address requirements from e-science and e-society, with respect to scientific, technology, policy and organisational issues.

For this edition, LREC goes East in order to support a stronger interaction and synergy with the Asian NLP community and to help promoting Asian Language Resources and Language Technologies.

CONFERENCE TOPICS:

  • Issues in the design, construction and use of LRs: text, speech, sign, gesture, image, in single or multimodal/multimedia data
  • Exploitation of LRs in systems and applications
  • Issues in LT evaluation
  • General issues regarding LRs & Evaluation

LREC 2018 HOT TOPICS

  • Asian Language Resources

Special attention will be devoted to highlight the wide variety of initiatives for the creation, use and evaluation of Asian Language Resources and Technologies. Special attention will be paid to Less-Resourced Languages in the Asian area, including (local) Sign Languages.

  • International Contribution to Olympics 2020

LREC 2018 would like to promote all LTs that would support better interactions and communications between the Olympic 2020 visitors and the local hosts. This involves all speech- and text-based computer interactions, speech/sign to speech/sign translations, human-human communications mediated by computers, etc. Assessment of the above mentioned technologies is also an important area within LREC 2018.

  • Language Resources in the online World

In a time in which more and more (language) data are generated, either by human beings or by machines, and directly streamed, the question arises how LRs and LTs can cope with this development. A first challenge is to address and to provide for correctives to hate speeches, cyberbullying, fake news, etc. Can LT provide means to process and respond in a timely manner to such language data streamed in a huge amount at high speed? In this context, language technologists have to intensify cooperation with humanities, especially social and political sciences, psychology but also economics, and more.

PROGRAMME

The Scientific Programme will include invited talks, oral presentations, poster and demo presentations, and panels, in addition to a keynote address by the winner of the Antonio Zampolli Prize. A
n Industrial Track will also be arranged.

SUBMISSIONS AND DATES

Submission of proposals for oral and poster (or poster+demo) papers: 25 September 2017

  • LREC2018 asks for extended abstracts of no less than 3000 words (references excluded), which must strictly follow the LREC stylesheet which will be available on the conference website. Extended abstracts should be submitted through START and will be peer-reviewed..

Submission of proposals for panels, workshops and tutorials: 25 September 2017

  • Proposals should be submitted via an online form on the LREC website and will be reviewed by the Programme Committee.

Further information here

New book, The Web as History, edited by professor Niels Brügger and Professor Ralph Schroeder, free PDF download

The web has been with us for more than a quarter of a century. It has become a daily and ubiquitous source of information in many peoples’ lives around the globe. But what does it tell us about historical and social change? For a researcher in the twenty-second century, it will seem unimaginable that someone studying the twenty-first century would do anything but draw heavily on the online world to tell them about peoples’ changing lives. Currently, however, the web remains an almost untapped source for research. This book aims to make a start in this direction.

The 12 chapters explore this topic from a number of interdisciplinary angles – through histories of national web spaces and case studies of different government and media domains – as well as an introduction that provides an overview of this exciting new area of research.

Chapter 3 ‘Exploring the domain names of the Danish web’ is written by Niels Brügger, Ditte Laursen and Janne Nielsen. What does an entire national web domain look like? And how can its development over time be understood? Using the Danish web as a case study, this chapter explores these questions by studying the historical development of the .dk domain names and the .dk domains archived in the Danish national web archive, Netarkivet, as well as in the international US-based web archive Internet Archive.

Editors

Niels Brügger is Professor and Head of the Centre for Internet Studies and of the internet research infrastructure NetLab, Aarhus University. He is co-founder and Managing Editor of the international journal, Internet Histories: Digital Technology, Culture and Society. Recent publications include Histories of Public Service Broadcasters on the Web (edited with Burns, 2012), and Web25, a themed issue of New Media & Society.

Ralph Schroeder is Professor and Director of the Master’s course in Social Science of the Internet at the Oxford Internet Institute. Before coming to Oxford University, he was Professor at Chalmers University in Gothenburg. His recent books include Rethinking Science, Technology and Social Change (2007) and, co-authored with Eric T. Meyer, Knowledge Machines: Digital Transformations of the Sciences and Humanities (2015).

Publication and License

The book is published by UCL Press with support from the School of Advanced Study, University of London, Aarhus University Research Foundation, and Webster Research and Consulting.

It is published under a Creative Common 4.0 International license (CC BY4.0). This license allows you to share, copy, distribute and transmit the work; to adapt the work and to make commercial use of the work providing attribution is made to the authors (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work).

Attribution should include the following information: Niels Brügger and Ralph Schroeder (eds.), The Web as History. London, UCL Press, 2017.  https://doi.org/10.14324/111.9781911307563

Download or buy the book as hardback, paperback or epub here

Please see events for already planned courses.

The course is offered by NetLab, a national digital research infrastructure, and a community under DIGHUMLAB.

The course can be taken only by appointment. There is no fixed date, since the course will be offered as needed on an ongoing basis. If you are interested, please take a further look in the brochure. 

More than 98% of the world’s data are now digital. A large part of the data are represented on the web, where content is added, deleted and edited constantly and worldwide. Web archiving is the preservation of content, and may be done individually, as well as by large-scale web archiving initiatives. Contemporary studies in the humanities and social sciences need to make use of web archives where earlier documents or versions may be retrieved, and to preserve findings on the live web for future analysis and reference.

The Online Course in Web Archives and Web Archiving will provide an opportunity to build an understanding of how and why archived web content differs from analogous material (such as printed books), and to get significant hands-on experience with web archives and web archiving, based on a focus in your own specific research interests.

The course is offered by NetLab, a national digital research infrastructure, and a community under DIGHUMLAB.

The course is free of charge for researchers and Ph.D. students at Aarhus University, Aalborg University, University of Copenhagen, University of Southern Denmark, or The Royal Danish Library.

The course will be offered as needed on an ongoing basis. A course may be arranged individually or for a group (with a maximum of eight participants). Our capacity is limited to offering the course  2-3 times per semester; applications for the course will be treated on a first-come, first-serve basis.

For researchers, it will be possible to get abbreviated versions of the course according to your specific needs.

For the full course, a course certificate will be issued upon completion.

For Ph.D. students, the course is equivalent to a Ph.D. seminar, counting as 3 ECTS.

The course is also avaliable for graduate students, for more information on this please refer to the course brochure below.

If you are interested, please take a further look in the brochure. You are welcome to download and send it to colleagues if you consider gathering people for a group course (miximum limit of eight participants).

The course can be accessed only upon agreement, after contacting us as specified in the brochure.

Find NetLab Web Archiving Course Brochure here

The course is hosted on DIGHUMLAB’s online courses portal here

Read more about NetLab, a community under DIGHUMLAB, here

Please see events for already planned courses.

Summer School in advanced tools for digital humanities and it, Bulgaria, 7 – 11 September 2017

The Centre for Excellence in the Humanities to the University of Sofia, Bulgaria, has the pleasure to invite, for a fourth time, experts in the fields of Digital Humanities and Information Technologies to an Advanced Summer School in Digital Humanities.

The summer school relies on the cooperation of world-leading instructors from academic institutions in the UK and USA and will include the following modules:

  • Training in Linked Spatial Data, Geo-annotation, Visualisation and Information system (Geography and Topography) – with Valeria Vitale (School of Advanced Studies, University of London), Gabriel Bodard (School of Advanced Studies, University of London);
  • Training in Python for data extraction, enriching and cataloguing – with Simona Stoyanova (School of Advanced Studies, University of London) and Gabriel Bodard (School of Advanced Studies, University of London);
  • Training in EpiDoc and TEI markup, use of vocabularies, and web delivery (including external URI use, XSLT customization, and entity normalization) – with Simona Stoyanova (School of Advanced Studies, University of London) and Gabriel Bodard (School of Advanced Studies, University of London);
  • Presentations in Big Data and Information Extraction – Dimitar Birov (University of Sofia) and Eduardo Miranda (Carnegie Mellon University of Pittsburgh).

A round table on the current trends and the future developments of Digital Humanities in South-East Europe.

The participation fee is 50 euros. The transport to and from the mountain resort and the accommodation and meals there will be covered by the organizers.

If you are interested in the Summer School, please send a Curriculum Vitae and a Motivation Letter stating your main areas of interest and expertise, the projects on which you are currently working, as well as which module(s) are relevant for your work and why you would like to attend them.

The applications should be sent to dhsummerschool@uni-sofia.bg no later than 15 June 2017.

More details about the event can be found here

Events

24 July – 18 August 2017, Aarhus

Are you interested in digital games and want to know what potentials virtual reality (VR) technologies have to offer in this regard? Today consumer VR technologies, from cardboard boxes containing lenses and smartphones to elaborate PC-driven systems, are set to become a part of everyday media use. Technology giants such as Facebook, Google and Valve are prioritizing VR and content providers of all stripes are eager to join in.

GAME.PLAY.THEORY is an interdisciplinary and project-oriented Summer School that revolves around digital games as research, media, design, culture and practice, this time with a specific focus on working with and rethinking VR.

The lecturers are themselves interdisciplinary in their approach having professional basis in media studies, information studies, digital design, educational design and technoogy, experience design and aesthetics.

The aim of the course is to gain insight into, discuss, critically reflect on and productively put to use different perspectives in a generative way in order to strengthen, sharpen and nuance one’s own profession in relation to digital games as phenomenon, practice and research domain. In this way, the distinctive humanistic theoretical, analytical, methodological and project-oriented skills and competencies of the individual student is put into play and put to use in the midterm and final exam where students and lectures meet to present, discuss and critically reflect on each others projects (perhaps even outside the university walls).

In 2017 the course has a special focus on ‘ReThink(ing) VR’ in tribute to Aarhus being the European Capital of Culture and will take the form as a mini-conference celebrating critical and creative re-thinking around the potentials, pitfalls and possibilities of VR in relation to digital games.

“RETHINK means that we build on what currently exists, while also exploring whether things can be done differently. The theme RETHINK provides Aarhus2017 with the opportunity to create a “cultural laboratory” in the whole region where innovation and alternative solutions can develop and take root.”

We will through ‘Game.Play.Theory’ work proactively with this, rethinking the meaning, design, interactions and experience that gameplay can hold.

Further information here

7 August – 22 September 2017, online

More than 98% of the world’s data are now digital. A large part of the data are represented on the web, where content is added, deleted and edited constantly and worldwide. Web archiving is the preservation of content, and may be done individually, as well as by large-scale web archiving initiatives. Contemporary studies in the humanities and social sciences need to make use of web archives where earlier documents or versions may be retrieved, and to preserve findings on the live web for future analysis and reference.

The Online Course in Web Archives and Web Archiving will provide an opportunity to build an understanding of how and why archived web content differs from analogous material (such as printed books), and to get significant hands-on experience with web archives and web archiving, based on a focus in your own specific research interests.

The course is offered by NetLab, a national digital research infrastructure, and a community under DIGHUMLAB.

The course is free of charge for researchers and Ph.D. students at Aarhus University, Aalborg University, University of Copenhagen, University of Southern Denmark, or The Royal Danish Library.

For Ph.D. students, the course is equivalent to a Ph.D. seminar, counting as 3 ECTS.

Further information and registration here

14 – 18 August 2017, Copenhagen

Big Data is omnipresent from industries to government and is frequently considered a completely new approach to problem solving. While the possibilities are often exaggerated, Big Data does indeed introduce new opportunities and challenges. The ability to analyse and combine large data from different sources has obvious applications, nonetheless, the lack of quality in the data combined with a high variance means that conventional analysis often fails.

This course will bring you to the forefront of the newest tools and methods based on cutting edge research and experience.

What you will learn
By completing the course you will be able to set up basic Big Data Analysis end-to-end; from retrieving and cleaning the data, to establishing the information level and extracting patterns and finding outliers and to curate the necessary data.

You will get acquainted with a number of advanced tools like: Data cleaning, statistical methods for very large datasets, data stream analysis and finding patterns and outliers in Big Data, collecting data from instruments and devices (i.e. internet of things) and hardware systems design for efficient BDA.

Course Content
We will use a few structured datasets consistently throughout the course, which illustrate the commerce and will be used to demonstrate the different steps in Big Data Analysis.

Core elements:

  • Data cleaning: Detecting and correcting (or removing) corrupt or inaccurate records
  • Statistical methods: Robust methods for very large datasets and data with very large variance and outliers
  • Finding patterns and outliers in Big Data: Which methods can be used to identify sparse patterns in very large datasets, and how to identify data that does not follow the overall pattern for a dataset?
  • Collecting data from instruments and devices: How to collect, store, and analyse data from a multitude of sources that produce data (i.e. Internet-of-Things)
  • Systems for Big Data Analysis: Common systems for BDA; Hadoop, PyDisco, etc., and hardware systems design for efficient BDA.

Tools/methods introduced:

  • Selected machine learning algorithms for large-scale data
  • Random forests and large-scale exact nearest neighbour search
  • Data curation: How to select data for long time curation, systems, techniques and standards for data curation
  • We will be working with several programming tools, however all techniques that are covered are easily implemented with all standard data-analysis languages; Python, R, etc.

Participants
The course is strictly focused on Big Data Analysis, thus a background in statistics and/or conventional data analysis is assumed. This course assumes an education at least at a Bachelor level and/or several years of data analysis experience.

Further information and registration here

In conjunction with the conference the first workshop on Language Technology for Digital Humanities in Central and (South-) Eastern Europe will take place.

During the last decades Digital Humanities evolved dramatically, from simple database applications to complex systems involving most recent state of the art in Computer Science. Especially Language Technology plays a major role either for processing the metadata of recorded objects or for analyzing and interpreting content.

Applying language technology methods to objects from humanities is a challenge for NLP-research: data is heterogeneous (image /text), often incomplete (e.g. OCR errors), multilingual within one document (historic documents with Latin or /and classical Greek paragraphs) and difficult to structure (paragraphs, titles, pages are somewhat different in historical texts).

Corpus-based methods, nowadays standard in NLP research cannot be often applied as the necessary large training data is missing.

Moreover requirements of tools for digital humanities, especially such tools dedicated to cultural heritage objects are different from those for tools applied to modern texts.

Thus performing research in Digital Humanities involves also adapting existent NLP Tools for historical variants of languages, developing tools for new languages, making tools robust for syntactic deviation and adapting semantic resources.

Central and Eastern Europe was always characterized by a high concentration of languages and cultures. Unfortunately, especially here many historical documents are in bad condition; many languages or dialects became extinct over the time and their written evidence is rare.

Digital Humanities seems the perfect means for preservation and investigation of this rich cultural heritage asset. However, up to now, dedicated activities seem to miss, probably also due to the lack of adequate NLP resources and tools. Thus it is imperiously necessary to evaluate existent technology, monitor current activities, network research teams in this area, all aims of proposed workshop.

Further information about RANLP 2017 and the workshop on Language Technology for Digital Humanities here

5 – 9  September 2017, Lisbon
 
The ”FCSH Digital Humanities Summer School: Research methods & Problem-solving” aims at providing concrete answers to specific needs and challenges emerging from projects carried out by master and PhD students, and post-doctoral researchers in the arts, humanities and social sciences. The workshops planned will be delivered by qualified international scholars and professionals aiming to improve, trough theoretical analysis and technological resources, the specific research challenges of the attendees.

Workshops will be organized in a collaborative and interdisciplinary environment to:

  • Focus the Digital Humanities approach on questions raised by students, scholars and professionals;
  • Facilitate the choice of methods, tools and techniques;
  • Shape the research outcomes trough a digital environment;
  • Improve collaborative research and information sharing.

“Tailored to what you need” is the principle that guides and inspires this summer school structured in the following interconnected workshops:

  1. Network analysis for historical and archaeological data
  2. Spatial visualisation of historical and archaeological data

More information and details about registration here

7 – 9 September 2017, Sofia

The Centre for Excellence in the Humanities to the University of Sofia, Bulgaria, has the pleasure to invite, for a fourth time, experts in the fields of Digital Humanities and Information Technologies to an Advanced Summer School in Digital Humanities.

The summer school relies on the cooperation of world-leading instructors from academic institutions in the UK and USA and will include the following modules:

  • Training in Linked Spatial Data, Geo-annotation, Visualisation and Information system (Geography and Topography) – with Valeria Vitale (School of Advanced Studies, University of London), Gabriel Bodard (School of Advanced Studies, University of London);
  • Training in Python for data extraction, enriching and cataloguing – with Simona Stoyanova (School of Advanced Studies, University of London) and Gabriel Bodard (School of Advanced Studies, University of London);
  • Training in EpiDoc and TEI markup, use of vocabularies, and web delivery (including external URI use, XSLT customization, and entity normalization) – with Simona Stoyanova (School of Advanced Studies, University of London) and Gabriel Bodard (School of Advanced Studies, University of London);
  • Presentations in Big Data and Information Extraction – Dimitar Birov (University of Sofia) and Eduardo Miranda (Carnegie Mellon University of Pittsburgh).

A round table on the current trends and the future developments of Digital Humanities in South-East Europe.

The participation fee is 50 euros. The transport to and from the mountain resort and the accommodation and meals there will be covered by the organizers.

If you are interested in the Summer School, please send a Curriculum Vitae and a Motivation Letter stating your main areas of interest and expertise, the projects on which you are currently working, as well as which module(s) are relevant for your work and why you would like to attend them.

The applications should be sent to dhsummerschool@uni-sofia.bg no later than 15 June 2017.

Further information here

Conference, Budapest, 18 – 20 September 2017

The CLARIN Annual Conference is the main annual event for those working on the construction and operation of CLARIN across Europe.

The  Conference is organised for the Humanities and Social Sciences community in order to exchange ideas and experiences on the CLARIN infrastructure. This includes its design, construction and operation, the data and services that it contains or should contain, its actual use by researchers, its relation to other infrastructures and projects, and the CLARIN Knowledge Sharing Infrastructure.

This event is organized by CLARIN ERIC in collaboration with the Research Institute for Linguistics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

Participation in this event is by invitation only. The categories of people to be invited will include authors of accepted papers, members of national consortia and representatives of CLARIN centres as well as representatives from partner organizations.  Once you have been invited to attend the conference, you will receive registration information from your national coordinator or the CLARIN ERIC Office.

Further information will be announced soon – here.

During the first day of the conference, the deans of the Danish universities within the fields of health, science and technology, social sciences and humanities will present the importance of e-science in their respective research fields.

Find more information and the full programme on the conference website here.

DIGHUMLAB, a national Digital Humanities Research Infrastructure, invites to a one-day conference, where we will put the digital research within the humanities and social sciences into perspective through two keynote talks.

Keynote speakers:

  • ‘Culture Analytics: Challenges for Multi-Scale Study’ by Professor Timothy R. Tangherlini, UCLA, University of California

  •  ‘Storing Stuff, Structuring Stories. The power of digital archives in contemporary historiography’ by Associate Professor Helle Strandgaard Jensen, Department of History and Classical Studies, Aarhus University

Furthermore, we will highlight some of the research activities through a number of shorter talks, posters and demonstrations of the outcome:

  • Highlights from the Special Interst Groups (SIGs)
  • Presentations: Research resulting from the use of DIGHUMLAB
  • Demonstrations and posters – from the DIGHUMLAB communities and the SIGs

DIGHUMLAB is a digital ecosystem supporting research and competence building within the humanities and social sciences in Denmark. It offers access to a range of tools and supporting activities organized in communities.

DIGHUMLAB is the Danish representative in the two European ERICs:

Presently the communities represented in DIGHUMLAB are:

Please sign-up here

It will be possible to join pre-sessions on November 10, where Richard Rogers’ book Digital Methods, which on ICA’s Outstanding Book Award in 2014,  will be the topic of discussion. 

On November 16 and 17, Centre for Internet Studies and NetLab will host a series of events featuring Richard Rogers, Professor of New Media and Digital Culture at the University of Amsterdam and director of the Digital Methods Initiative.

The Digital Methods Initiative (DMI) is one of the leading research groups within Internet Studies, and they specialise in designing methods and tools for repurposing online devices and platforms (Twitter, Facebook, Google etc.) for research into social and political issues.

We will return with more information and how to sign up later.

Please read more about the other events here

 

Centre for Internet Studies and NetLab will host a series of events featuring Richard Rogers, Professor of New Media and Digital Culture at the University of Amsterdam and director of the Digital Methods Initiative.

Richard Rogers is the author of Digital Methods (MIT Press, 2013), which won ICA’s Outstanding Book Award in 2014, The End of the Virtual (Amsterdam University Press, 2009), Information Politics on the Web (MIT Press, 2004/2005) and many other publications.

The Digital Methods Initiative (DMI) is one of the leading research groups within Internet Studies, and they specialise in designing methods and tools for repurposing online devices and platforms (Twitter, Facebook, Google etc.) for research into social and political issues.

Instead of migrating existing social science methods onto the web as is often the practice within the social sciences, DMI writes and repurposes tools specifically designed to run online.

The DMI toolbox includes, among other things, tools that can extract URLs from different sources, scrape images, extract datasets from Facebook, scrape Pinterest for pins, capture tweets, extract data from YouTube, compare images across language versions of wikipedia etc.

One of the most well-known tools developed by DMI is the Issue Crawler, a server-side Web crawler, co-link machine and graph visualizer, which maps online networks working in the same issue area. More information here

The two days will include:

1) A lecture with a broad introduction to Digital Methods, hosted by the Centre for Internet Studies. The lecture is open for all.

2) A workshop for researchers at Media Studies and Information Studies.

3) A workshop for students at Media Studies (all semesters, max. 25 students will be able to participate).

4) A talk (possibly also a short workshop) about Digital Methods and the archived web, hosted by NetLab Forum.

The exact schedule of events is still in the workings but we will return with more information and the way to sign up for one or more events.

It will also be possible to join pre-sessions on November 10, where Rogers’ book Digital Methods will be the topic of discussion. 

The lecturers are Claus Povlsen, CST and Kristoffer L. Nielbo, DIGHUMLAB.

The recent explosion in digitized and digital text-media is thoroughly changing the evidential basis for the humanities.

While the humanities used to be the principal scientific consumers of text-based data, the majority of text analysis is now performed by ‘machines’ outside traditional humanistic domains.

Text-Analytics applies automated and data-intensive techniques in order to extract useful knowledge from large collections of linguistic data.

In this PhD course, the participant will acquire experience with two major machine learning paradigms (supervised and unsupervised learning) in order to answer research questions fundamental to the humanities: can we classify texts by genres, periods and status and how do surface structures reveal latent semantic properties.

The workshop consists of a series of hands-on tutorials with Python combined with useful explanations and illustrations through use-cases. Programming experience is not a requirement, but participants are expected to prepare by installing Python and completing three introductory tutorials available on-line. Information about this will be distributed by the lecturers after the registration deadline.

Find more information here

This mini-conference on BIG VIDEO will take place at Aalborg University, Denmark.

The keynote speakers are:

  1. Anne Harris, RMIT, Australia
  2. Robert Willim, Lund University, Sweden
  3. Adam Fouse, Aptima, USA
  4. Paul McIlvenny & Jacob Davidsen, Aalborg University

The conference is supported by the national Digital Humanities Lab 1.0 infrastructure programme in Denmark, with assistance from the Department of Communication and Psychology.

Find more details here

The 4th Digital Humanities Austria Conference in cooperation with DARIAH, CLARIN and Digital Humanities Austria will take place at the University of Innsbruck.
 

The conference this year is according to the motto “Data First!?”. The (half)-automatized data production and its quality, analysis, interpretation and visualization is gaining importance throughout the humanities.

The purpose of this conference is to develop an exchange of experiences between humanities scholars, employees of libraries, archives, as well as computer sciences and technologies.

Successful research activities in the field of digital humanities are (almost) always determined by interdisciplinarity, skills of different research fields will be required. Due to that, the involvement of new developments in related research areas is important to us.

Young scientists are particularly encouraged to present their research results in front of a broad audience – for example in the form of a poster or a demonstration.

Further information here

The 3rd conference of the association of Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries (DHN) will be held at the University of Helsinki March 7–9, 2018. The conference is organised by the Faculty of Arts at the University of Helsinki.

In 2018, the conference seeks to extend the scope of digital humanities research covered, both into new areas, as well as beyond the Nordic and Baltic countries. This year, the conference welcomes in particular work related to the following themes: History, Cultural Heritage, Games, and Future.

The overarching theme this year is Open Science. This pragmatic concept emphasises the role of transparent and reproducible research practices, open dissemination of results, and new forms of collaboration, all greatly facilitated by digitalisation. All proposals are invited to reflect on the benefits, challenges, and prospects of open science for their own research. 

Information will be provided on the conference website here

In April 2018, the Faculty of Arts of KU Leuven and the KU Leuven Libraries are hosting a European Conference for the Humanities on behalf of the European Consortium of Humanities Institutes and Centres (ECHIC).

Like the preceding ECHIC conferences in Dublin, Utrecht, Nottingham, Oporto, Pamplona, Macerata and Edinburgh, the conference aims to probe some of the most pressing issues facing the humanities as academic disciplines and interdisciplinary fields.

In 2018, the theme is “Equip & Engage: Research and Dissemination Infrastructures for the Humanities”. Papers and discussions will be focused around (challenges connected to) digital scholarship in the humanities and the dissemination and impact of the results of this research.

The conference programme will feature keynote lectures, conference papers, project presentations/demos, lightning talks and panel discussions, as well as the annual meeting of ECHIC and diverse networking opportunities.

Confirmed keynote speakers are Jane Ohlmeyer, who is Erasmus Smith’s Professor of Modern History and Director of Trinity Long Room Hub at Trinity College Dublin, and Martin Paul Eve, who is Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing at Birkbeck, University of London, and well-known for his work on open access and HE policy.

Further information here

11th conference on Language Resources and Evaluation, main conference: 9-10-11 May 2018, workshops and tutorials: 7-8 & 12 May 2018

Conference Aims:

LREC is the major event on Language Resources (LRs) and Evaluation for Human Language Technologies (HLT). LREC aims to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art, explore new R&D directions and emerging trends, exchange information regarding LRs and their applications, evaluation methodologies and tools, communicate on-going and planned activities, identify industrial uses and needs, and address requirements from e-science and e-society, with respect to scientific, technology, policy and organisational issues.

For this edition, LREC goes East in order to support a stronger interaction and synergy with the Asian NLP community and to help promoting Asian Language Resources and Language Technologies.

LREC provides a unique forum for researchers, industrials and funding agencies from a wide spectrum of related disciplines to discuss issues and opportunities, find new synergies and promote initiatives for international cooperation, in support of investigations in language sciences, progress in language technologies (LT) and development of corresponding products, services and applications, and standards.

Conference Topics:

  • Issues in the design, construction and use of LRs: text, speech, sign, gesture, image, in single or multimodal/multimedia data
  • Exploitation of LRs in systems and applications
  • Issues in LT evaluation
  • General issues regarding LRs & Evaluation

LREC 2018 hot Topics:

  • Asian Language Resources

Special attention will be devoted to highlight the wide variety of initiatives for the creation, use and evaluation of Asian Language Resources and Technologies. Special attention will be paid to Less-Resourced Languages in the Asian area, including (local) Sign Languages.

  • International Contribution to Olympics 2020

LREC 2018 would like to promote all LTs that would support better interactions and communications between the Olympic 2020 visitors and the local hosts. This involves all speech- and text-based computer interactions, speech/sign to speech/sign translations, human-human communications mediated by computers, etc. Assessment of the above mentioned technologies is also an important area within LREC 2018.

  • Language Resources in the online World

In a time in which more and more (language) data are generated, either by human beings or by machines, and directly streamed, the question arises how LRs and LTs can cope with this development. A first challenge is to address and to provide for correctives to hate speeches, cyberbullying, fake news, etc. Can LT provide means to process and respond in a timely manner to such language data streamed in a huge amount at high speed? In this context, language technologists have to intensify cooperation with humanities, especially social and political sciences, psychology but also economics, and more.

Further information here